November 21, 2012
"Human eyes have around 100 million photoreceptors, each of which can pick up about ten visual events every second, so our eyes are effectively receiving a billion pieces of information each second."

— On the limited capacity of the human brain (via explore-blog)

(Source: , via explore-blog)

October 29, 2012

wnycradiolab:

expose-the-light:

Heart of Glass: The Art of Medical Models

Obviously in love with this.

August 8, 2012
curiositycounts:

Another example of true innovation! The brilliant AmoeBAND is a design concept for a first aid bandage with a clever tear-away adjustable shape and an indicator that changes color if an infection is detected (video). The concept was created by design students at Shih Chien University in Taiwan. Here’s hoping this makes it to market!(via) 

curiositycounts:

Another example of true innovation! The brilliant AmoeBAND is a design concept for a first aid bandage with a clever tear-away adjustable shape and an indicator that changes color if an infection is detected (video). The concept was created by design students at Shih Chien University in Taiwan. Here’s hoping this makes it to market!

(via

(Source: curiositycounts)

June 28, 2012
"Our taste derives from the summation of all that we have learnt from others, experienced and thought"

— Truth on science and creativity from 1957 (via explore-blog)

(Source: , via explore-blog)

June 22, 2012
"Our inability to properly monitor the sources of our ideas leads to the common phenomenon of cryptomnesia – thinking that what is really a memory is actually a new idea – and in some cases inadvertent plagiarism. In brainstorming tasks, people will often repeat others’ ideas without realizing it. To counter cryptomnesia while researching my book, I make note of when I come across an idea that surprises me so that I can accurately attribute it later. It’s easy to absorb an idea and then believe honestly that it was generated by yourself. (Or, more subtly, to remember where one first heard an idea but later find it no longer surprising and in fact so obvious and intuitive that it doesn’t deserve explicit attribution—a type of hindsight bias.)"

Matthew Hutson on inception as “a simple matter of persuasion and cryptomnesia.” Hutson is the author of The 7 Laws of Magical Thinking


Also see neuroscientist David Eagleman’s Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain, which delves into how our brains synthesize memories, impressions, and other mental resources into what we call “ideas.”

(via explore-blog)

(Source: , via explore-blog)

May 31, 2012
curiositycounts:

More spectacular solar eclipse photos continue to surface. Just stunning. 
(via)

curiositycounts:

More spectacular solar eclipse photos continue to surface. Just stunning. 

(via)

(Source: curiositycounts)

April 4, 2012

curiositycounts:

Fascinating TEDed talk by Mythbuster’s Adam Savage on some of history’s biggest breakthroughs and how they came to be from simple ideas. How these people “were just a little bit more curious…and they changed the world.”

(via)

(Source: curiositycounts)

March 23, 2012
world-shaker:

I guess that’s one way to remember.

world-shaker:

I guess that’s one way to remember.

(via world-shaker-deactivated2013092)

11:30am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZNHLXyIQpyJ2
  
Filed under: science education lol meme STEM 
March 18, 2012
world-shaker:

I’m ashamed to admit how much I laughed at this.

world-shaker:

I’m ashamed to admit how much I laughed at this.

(via world-shaker-deactivated2013092)

12:21am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZNHLXyI8qyrO
  
Filed under: science lol 
February 24, 2012
"

[W]hen thinking about difficult, exciting, interesting activities, such as investing in a new business, or perhaps buying a $10 million lottery ticket, the brain areas associated with emotion — such as the midbrain dopamine system — become more active.

Images, colours, music, even social discussion means that the midbrain emotional area becomes dominant, and the rational part of the brain finds it hard to resist the temptation. The emotional centres of the brain simply tell the rational part to shape up or ship out.

The rational part of the brain agrees, and starts to look for evidence that supports the emotional brain — it becomes an ally in the search for reasons why the emotional choice is a good one.

"

— The neuroscience of the constant tug-of-war between rationality and intuition in a world that sees them as a binary divide.   (via)

(via theatlantic)

4:30pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZNHLXyGy5tsi
  
Filed under: science 
February 18, 2012

unknownskywalker:

Ancient Galaxy Collision Created Enormous Stellar Swirls

New simulations suggest that enormous swirls of stars surrounding a distant galaxy formed when two equal-sized galaxies collided. The galaxy, named NGC 5907, is located 50 million light-years away in the constellation Draco.

Its loops and currents, containing stars, gas and dust, are 150,000 light-years across. Researchers studying these swirls previously thought they were formed when a relatively small galaxy hit a larger one, getting torn apart in the process.

But in the new study, a massive computer simulation shows that it would have been impossible for a very small galaxy to produce the observed streams. More likely, two roughly equal-sized galaxies crashed into each other 8 or 9 billion years ago. The simulation also showed that the galaxies must have been very gas-rich in order to produce the swirls surrounding NGC 5907.

Most large spiral galaxies are thought to have formed from similar processes. Over the history of the universe, smaller galaxies have collided with one another and merged, producing ever-larger galaxies. Our own Milky Way galaxy is headed on a crash course with the neighboring Andromeda galaxy in 4.5 billion years.

Above: (1) Visible light image of NGC 5907. (2) Simulation of the collisions that produced NGC 5907 (1 Gyr = 1 billion years).

(via inothernews)

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